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On November 11, people across the country will take a moment to honor our military veterans, who have sacrificed the

Sisters and Brothers,

The observance of Juneteenth is recognition of a profound milestone in our nation’s history. And while our struggles for equality in the United States have been long and difficult and sometimes fraught with setbacks and terrible loss, today we reflect on how far we, as Americans, have come in this journey.

A culture of belonging and caring for each other starts with each one of us. In honor of Juneteenth, on Friday, June 18, we are inviting you to acknowledge and celebrate an important moment in U.S. history.

Juneteenth is an annual celebration on June 19 marking the end of slavery in the United States. Though the Emancipation Proclamation took effect in 1863, freedom would not come for many enslaved African Americans until years later. On June 19th, 1865, Union soldiers brought news of the Civil War’s end to Galveston bringing with them freedom for the 250,000 people enslaved in Texas. Juneteenth was made an official U.S. federal holiday yesterday.

By Rory L. Gamble CIVIL AND HUMAN RIGHTS BELONG TO US ALL Look around your world these days. People are celebrating the diversity of who they are; what makes us all unique, wonderful people. For UAW members in the workplace and at home we live in a time when prejudices are no longer being tolerated, whether it is racial, ethnic, or sexual identity. We find ourselves living in a time where equality in the workplace and in our communities is valued more than it ever has.

My Brothers and Sisters,

We have all been through a year that none of us could have possibly imagined, and I want to begin this message with a note of thanks to my UAW family for their strength and Solidarity in facing a worldwide pandemic that has forever altered all of our lives. I could not be more proud of what we have accomplished and I am confident that we will continue to do the hard work to keep one another safe.

Now an International event, Earth Day has been celebrated since April 22, 1970 and its origins are here in the United States. In fact, this annual celebration wouldn’t exist without legendary UAW leader Walter Reuther.

Detroit — I watched in horror last week and this weekend, along with the rest of our nation, as the headlines rolled in once again with reports of bloodshed, terror, tragedy and senseless loss of lives. America woke up Friday morning to the news of a mass shooting in Indianapolis, Indiana that took the lives of eight innocent people and injured several others. By the end of this weekend, at least nine more people had been killed in shootings across the country — in Illinois, Texas, Wisconsin, Ohio, Nebraska and Louisiana.

More lives lost to gun violence.

In this issue’s cover story, some UAW members outline what they say they would like to see President Biden tackle early in his term.

Other stories include: