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Photo by Detroit News Archives Originally posted on DetroitNews.com By Rory L. Gamble With images of an insurrection at our nation’s Capitol this month, we all are experiencing a nation divided like none of us has ever seen. We are divided by politics. By opinions. By economics. By beliefs. The cause? Well, that is up for debate. What isn’t up for debate is that this is a time to look to — and take heart in — the words of President John F. Kennedy and heed the warning of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. that healing our nation starts with us. Each of us must personally seek to find what unites us and foster that, bond with it, build upon it, so that we can move forward to a better place for us all.

Detroit - “Hand on Bible, in the seat of the world’s longest democratic republic, President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris took an oath that carries the hopes and dream

Sisters and Brothers,

This week we will see a new Administration sworn into office in Washington, D.C.

The Spring 2020 edition of Solidarity magazine is now online! The latest edition of Solidarity magazine salutes our own heroes who are fighting the COVID-19 pandemic in a variety of ways, from courageously going back to the plants to make PPE and ventilators to volunteering in the community and much more.
The COVID-19 pandemic has sent our world into a public health and economic tailspin. As of May, the national unemployment rate was at 13.3%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In Michigan, it is a staggering 21.2% — worse than the Great Recession. The Washington Post reports that more than 100,000 businesses have closed permanently.
On June 23, 1963, over 125,000 people marched down Woodward Avenue in Detroit, Michigan in the 'Walk to Freedom.' The march was the largest civil rights demonstration at the time highlighting the injustices African Americans faced across the country.
For Gerald Kariem, Juneteenth feels even more special in Detroit. So many successful Black Americans today are descendants of the millions of men and women who left the south for work in the north starting back in 1916 to build Ford cars.
Today, we take time to honor the memory of our lost brother, George Floyd. We will sit still, we will put down our tools and silence our phones for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. A full eight minutes and 46 seconds -- the agonizing amount of time that Mr. Floyd lay on the pavement begging for his life.
Dear Sisters and Brothers, As trade unionists and as Americans, we were outraged and heartsick at the horror of George Floyd’s death on May 25. It was yet another tragedy in a long and sorrowful history of the divisiveness of racism in this nation. Since that day in communities from coast to coast, we have seen Americans from all walks of life, black, brown and white, stand together to demand change. To demand – finally – that we address the systemic racial divide that has plagued our nation since its inception.