Blog

Open Letter in Regard to GM: I am not a spokesman for anyone other than myself and the words in this opinion piece are mine and they pertain specifically and solely to me. Since retiring on July 1, 2010, I have avoided speaking to the media. I read with disgust and dismay some newspaper articles pertaining to me yesterday. I do not blame the reporters. They were covering a story based on statements taken from General Motors’ Motion to Alter or Amend Judgment against Fiat Chrysler and others, dated August 3, 2020. I do, however, place the blame squarely on GM for their malicious and utterly baseless attack against me and a supposed “unnamed” member of my family.

“Outside the bubble of Washington, D.C. our families continue to struggle with an economy devastated by this pandemic.

Today in Boston, Mass., a lawsuit filed by Harvard University and MIT challenging Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) new directive on student visas was heard.

The COVID-19 pandemic has sent our world into a public health and economic tailspin. As of May, the national unemployment rate was at 13.3%, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In Michigan, it is a staggering 21.2% — worse than the Great Recession. The Washington Post reports that more than 100,000 businesses have closed permanently.
On June 23, 1963, over 125,000 people marched down Woodward Avenue in Detroit, Michigan in the 'Walk to Freedom.' The march was the largest civil rights demonstration at the time highlighting the injustices African Americans faced across the country.
For Gerald Kariem, Juneteenth feels even more special in Detroit. So many successful Black Americans today are descendants of the millions of men and women who left the south for work in the north starting back in 1916 to build Ford cars.
Today, we take time to honor the memory of our lost brother, George Floyd. We will sit still, we will put down our tools and silence our phones for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. A full eight minutes and 46 seconds -- the agonizing amount of time that Mr. Floyd lay on the pavement begging for his life.
Dear Sisters and Brothers, As trade unionists and as Americans, we were outraged and heartsick at the horror of George Floyd’s death on May 25. It was yet another tragedy in a long and sorrowful history of the divisiveness of racism in this nation. Since that day in communities from coast to coast, we have seen Americans from all walks of life, black, brown and white, stand together to demand change. To demand – finally – that we address the systemic racial divide that has plagued our nation since its inception.
My Sisters and Brothers, I want to begin this message by recognizing the strength and courage of this union and each and every one of you. These past couple of months have been extraordinarily difficult for all of us — and for all of America. And as we work to open up our economy and go back to work, I know there are so many concerns and fears.